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States that rely on the Colorado River brace for cuts and conflicts

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A view from the top of Glen Canyon Dam where the historically low water levels are visible, about 180 feet lower than their peak. (Peter O'Dowd/Here & Now)
A view from the top of Glen Canyon Dam where the historically low water levels are visible, about 180 feet lower than their peak. (Peter O'Dowd/Here & Now)

For the first time ever, federal water managers have declared a "Tier 2" shortage on the Colorado River. As a result, Arizona will lose 21% of its river water next year — a crushing blow to local farmers.

But the latest round of cuts are just the beginning of what could become a prolonged period of scarcity and conflict in the West.

Here & Now's Jane Clayson speaks with Sarah Porter, director of the Kyle Center for Water Management at Arizona State University.

This segment aired on August 25, 2022.

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