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Boston Marathon Bombing Survivor's Charity To Give Prosthetic To Walpole Woman

Boston Marathon bombing survivor Heather Abbott speaks during an interview at her home in Newport, R.I., in December 2014. For Abbott, who lost her left leg, One Fund Boston helped cover the costly prosthetics that allowed her to reclaim some degree of normalcy. (Elise Amendola/AP)
Boston Marathon bombing survivor Heather Abbott speaks during an interview at her home in Newport, R.I., in December 2014. For Abbott, who lost her left leg, One Fund Boston helped cover the costly prosthetics that allowed her to reclaim some degree of normalcy. (Elise Amendola/AP)
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A charity founded by a woman injured in the Boston Marathon bombing will make its first donation Monday.

The Heather Abbott Foundation will give a prosthetic leg to Hillary Cohen, of Walpole, whose right leg was amputated two years ago because of a health condition.

Abbott says the prosthetic device will allow Cohen to wear high heels, which is something the 26-year-old has never done before.

"Hillary, because these leg problems started so young, has never been able to wear high-heel[ed] shoes, that was something that she's always wanted," Abbott said. "And as a female, I could certainly relate to that."

Abbott wears a prosthetic leg herself, having chosen to amputate her left leg rather than live in greater pain as a result of the injuries she sustained in the marathon attacks.

In this 2013 file photo, Heather Abbott wears her "high-definition" silicon prosthetic leg, right, which allows her to also wear 4-inch high heels. (Stephan Savoia/AP)
In this 2013 file photo, Heather Abbott wears her "high-definition" silicon prosthetic leg, right, which allows her to also wear 4-inch high heels. (Stephan Savoia/AP)

One of Abbott's prostheses allows her to wear high-heeled shoes.

"Sometimes, I think: Why am I doing this to myself? Because I could just wear regular flat shoes," Abbott told NPR last year, while wearing high heels. "But I don't want to give things up that I love to do."

Abbott started her nonprofit two years ago.

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