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Martin's Park Opens To Honor 8-Year-Old Victim Of Boston Marathon Bombing03:21
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Hundreds of people gathered at a playground Saturday to honor the youngest victim of the Boston Marathon bombings.

The centerpiece of the newly unveiled Martin's Park on the Boston waterfront is a wooden fishing boat. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)
The centerpiece of the newly unveiled Martin's Park on the Boston waterfront is a wooden fishing boat. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

The newly opened Martin’s Park is named in memory of 8-year-old Martin Richard, who was killed in the 2013 terrorist attack.

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh touts the park, along South Boston's waterfront, as an architectural feat and an example of the resolve of the city and the Richard family.

“This park is amazing when you think about every aspect of this park, what’s here, an inclusive park that is setting the model for us now in the rest of the city, a resilient component to it on the side of the ocean,” Walsh said.

Martin's Park and the Children's Museum by the Fort Point Channel. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)
Martin's Park and the Children's Museum by the Fort Point Channel. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

But none of that was on most kids' minds on Saturday. They just wanted to play in the water or in a hull of a sailboat. Like 10-year-old Jeffrey Alicea Jr.

"It's really big, there's a lot of people and it's cool and I think it's going to be pretty fun,” Alicea said.

It was pretty fun for a lot of kids in attendance. But for parents, the new public space means more.

Krishen and Tara emerge from a ride down the tube slide at Martin's Park. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)
Krishen and Tara emerge from a ride down the tube slide at Martin's Park. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

The park is billed as an inclusive and accessible park. Which is important for Regina Robins. Her 11-year-old son Josiah has Down syndrome.

"And the fact that this has been so accessible for people with all disabilities has been really a blessing for me, so this is just a beautiful park to honor the memory of a beautiful boy,” Robbins said.

While the opening of the park was an enjoyable day for most families, it was one of mixed emotions for the Richard family.

Emmitt, 19 months, and Myles, 3, play in the water fountains at Martin's Park. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)
Emmitt, 19 months, and Myles, 3, play in the water fountains at Martin's Park. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

Martin Richard's sister Jane, who lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombing, sang a song during the opening ceremony.

And his brother Henry says the park is a good representation of who Martin was.

"Well, it's a very big inclusive park,” he said. “It's a very peaceful place. Everyone can access it, and that's a really big part of the message."

A banner hanging at the entrance of Martin's Park reads "No more hurting people." (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)
A banner hanging at the entrance of Martin's Park reads "No more hurting people." (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

The message refers to a banner Martin is photographed holding in his class. It read: "No more hurting people. Peace."

This segment aired on June 16, 2019.

Earlier Coverage:

Quincy Walters Twitter Reporter
Quincy Walters is a general assignment reporter for WBUR.

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