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Andrea Campbell claims victory to become Massachusetts' first Black woman attorney general 

Andrea Campbell speaks during this year's Massachusetts attorney general debate at WBUR’s CitySpace. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
Andrea Campbell speaks during this year's Massachusetts attorney general debate at WBUR’s CitySpace. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

In a historic victory, Andrea Campbell handily defeated her opponent to become the first Black woman elected attorney general in Massachusetts, according to The Associated Press.

Campbell's election as the state's top law enforcement official caps a swift rise for the former Boston city councilor, who last year placed third in the Boston mayoral primary.

Voters faced a stark choice between Campbell and her opponent, Republican Jay McMahon. McMahon, a supporter of former President Donald Trump, ran on a tough-on-crime and anti-immigration platform.

Campbell promised to protect abortion access in Massachusetts and enforce strong oversight over police.

On the campaign trail, Campbell often framed her pursuit of public office and legal reforms in the context of her personal story.

Her father cycled in and out of prison, while her twin brother, Andre, died in police custody awaiting trial. Campbell graduated from Princeton University and UCLA Law School.

Campbell won the party's nomination for attorney general after an expensive and often contentious Democratic primary.

Her primary opponent Shannon Liss-Riordan, a prominent labor attorney, criticized Campbell's support from Super PACs. Campbell accused Liss-Riordan of using her considerable personal wealth to try to "buy" the election.

A third candidate, former Assistant Attorney General Quentin Palfrey, dropped out and endorsed Campbell before the election.

Campbell is set to be sworn into office in January.

Walter Wuthmann Twitter General Assignment Reporter
Walter Wuthmann is a general assignment reporter for WBUR.

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