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New Orleans Four Years Later23:51
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People fill Bourbon Street in the French Quarter of New Orleans last February, ahead of this year's Mardi Gras weekend. (AP)
People fill Bourbon Street in the French Quarter of New Orleans last February, ahead of this year's Mardi Gras weekend. (AP)

Four years ago, Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans and divided time there forever. There was the city before, and the city after. No one can forget Katrina—a nightmare that turned the Gulf Coast into a refugee crisis unlike any in American history.

Or has everyone outside New Orleans forgotten Katrina, and assumed that the American city of jazz has recovered just about as much as it ever will?

New Orleans has become a city of staggering, and often conflicting, statistics.

Over 62,000 blighted homes — but a rapidly improving education system. People still living in trailers, but others investing in food and culture.

This Hour, On Point: We take the pulse of New Orleans with writers and residents.

You can join the conversation. Tell us what you think — here on this page, on Twitter, and on Facebook.Guests:

Jarvis DeBerry, editorial writer and columnist for the New Orleans Times-Picayune.

Julia Reed, contributing editor and food columnist for Newsweek. She's also author of "The House on First Street: My New Orleans Story."

Jason Berry, author of "Up From the Cradle of Jazz: New Orleans Music Since World War II," released in a new edition this year. He's also author of many other books, including "Last of the Red Hot Poppas" and "Vows of Silence: The Abuse of Power in the Papacy of John Paul."

This program aired on August 31, 2009.

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