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Cuba, Travel and Human Rights24:02
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A driver waits for a green light next to the Cuban Capitol building in Havana, Wednesday, March 11, 2009. (AP)
A driver waits for a green light next to the Cuban Capitol building in Havana, Wednesday, March 11, 2009. (AP)

For decades, most Cuban-Americans in the United States wanted to shut Fidel Castro off and shut him down. No trade, no travel.
Most still aren’t fans. But since April, Cuban-Americans have been allowed to travel to Cuba. And they like it.
Now, there’s a serious push on — after years of a U.S. ban — to lift travel restrictions to Cuba for all Americans. Even human rights advocates complaining about Cuba say it’s time to open the floodgates.
Are they right? This hour, On Point: Human rights and nights in Havana. We’ll look at the new push to lift the ban on American travel to Cuba.
You can join the conversation. Tell us what you think — here on this page, on Twitter, and on Facebook.Guests:

Joining us from Washington is Lesley Clark, national corrrespondent for the Miami Herald.

Joining us in our studio is Anita Snow, former Havana bureau chief for the Associated Press.

From New York, we're joined by Nik Steinberg, researcher at Human Rights Watch and lead author of the new report, just out last week, "New Castro, Same Cuba."

And from Paterson, N.J., we're joined by Rep. Bill Pascrell, Democratic congressman representing New Jersey’s 8th District. He supports keeping the U.S. Cuba policy in place. He signed a letter, along with 52 other Democrats, to Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi opposing efforts to lift the travel ban.

This program aired on November 24, 2009.

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