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Arizona, Immigration, and the Law23:53
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The legal road ahead for Arizona’s immigration law. We look at the appeals and the arguments to come.

Border fence separating Nogales, Ariz., and Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, Tuesday, July 2010. (AP)
Border fence separating Nogales, Ariz., and Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, Tuesday, July 2010. (AP)

In the fight over Arizona’s toughest-in-the-nation immigration law, round one went to the Obama administration. A federal judge struck down the most controversial components.

But Arizona’s governor Jan Brewer vowed “the fight is far from over.” The state filed an appeal, and there’s talk of tweaking the law to smooth its path through the courts.

Round two in this battle is set for the 9th Circuit in November. And, then—most likely—on to the Supreme Court. Twenty states are considering similar laws. Protesters on both sides have taken to the streets.

This hour, On Point: Arizona appeals, now what?Guests:

Daniel Gonzalez, immigration reporter for the Arizona Republic.

David Savage, Supreme Court correspondent for the Los Angeles Times.

John Eastman, professor of law at Chapman University Law School. Clerked for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Served as the Director of Congressional & Public Affairs at the United States Commission on Civil Rights during the Reagan administration.

Gabriel Chin, professor of law at the University of Arizona Law School. Expert on immigration law.

This program aired on August 2, 2010.

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