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Egypt's Revolution: Where This Goes24:19
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We ask where this revolution goes. The New York Times' Roger Cohen joins us from Tahrir Square.

Egyptian Wael Ghonim, center, a 30-year-old Google Inc. marketing manager who was a key organizer of the online campaign that sparked the first protest on Jan. 25, talks to the crowd in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Feb. 8, 2011. (AP)
Egyptian Wael Ghonim, center, a 30-year-old Google Inc. marketing manager who was a key organizer of the online campaign that sparked the first protest on Jan. 25, talks to the crowd in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Feb. 8, 2011. (AP)

History is unfolding today in Egypt. After 17 days of uprising in the streets, Egypt's once-untouchable ruler of thirty years, President Hosni Mubarak, is in the end game.

After days of masses of Egyptians calling — and fighting — in the streets for "freedom." When we first aired this show, Mubarak was still, apparently, fully in power. We asked: where will this revolution go?

That question remains urgently relevant. You will hear, in the course of this hour, the dramatic word, rumors — trickling, then rushing in — that Mubarak would go.

We discuss revolution in Egypt.
-Tom Ashbrook
Guests:

Roger Cohen, columnist for the New York Times. He joins us from Cairo.

David Makovsky, distinguished fellow and director of the Project on the Middle East Peace Process at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. He's co-author, with Dennis Ross, of “Myths, Illusions, and Peace: Finding a New Direction for America in the Middle East."

This program aired on February 10, 2011.

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