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The Dreamers' Take On Immigration Reform47:09
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American immigration reform. Executive orders. Pushback. And the Dreamer view.

Supporters of immigration reform attend a rally in front of the White House in Washington, Friday, Nov. 21, 2014, thanking President Obama for his executive action on illegal immigration. (AP)
Supporters of immigration reform attend a rally in front of the White House in Washington, Friday, Nov. 21, 2014, thanking President Obama for his executive action on illegal immigration. (AP)

In November, President Obama took executive action to shield millions of undocumented immigrants from deportation.  Political opponents went ballistic.  In January – now – the counter-attack is on.  The clock is ticking down on funding for federal immigration workers.  The new Republican Congress is ready to rumble.  The president said "You do something, or I will."  There is a problem here – politically, practically.  This hour On Point:  we talk with those in the middle of it. Young immigrant “dreamers” who want a new way in America, and a Tea Party stalwart who says “no.”
-- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Greisa Martinez, field organizer for United We Dream, an immigrant-led youth organization. Undocumented immigrant. (@grei_sa)

Moses Chege, freshman at Whitworth University in Spokane, WA. Undocumented immigrant. (@themoseschege)

Katrina Pierson, Tea Party activist and spokesperson for the Tea Party Leadership Fund. (@katrinapierson)

Fawn Johnson, correspondent for the National Journal. (@fawnjohnson)

From Tom’s Reading List

Washington Post: Your complete guide to Obama’s immigration executive action — "There are roughly 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States, and political leaders of both parties agree the current system is broken and needs fixing. Yet Obama's action has outraged Republicans in Congress, who say the president doesn't have the authority to delay deportations for such a large class of people without legislation."

Los Angeles Times: It's time for Congress to agree on a humane immigration solution — "The solution: a congressional fix to make the system more humane — by granting relief to many who have lived and worked in the country for years — and also more tailored to the nation's needs, including making accommodations for agricultural workers and others whose labors are desired here. It's a new year, and a new Congress, so who knows, maybe a legislative miracle can happen. Regardless, the answer is not 'deport them all.'"

Miami Herald: Florida joins 17 other states in lawsuit against President Obama’s executive immigration plan — "Of the 18 states now suing the Obama administration over immigration, all have Republican governors or Republican attorneys general. But Florida is the only major swing state with a significant Hispanic population, making Bondi’s decision a potential presidential campaign issue as the 2016 election cycle gets underway. In a written statement, Bondi said the lawsuit isn’t about politics, it’s about Obama circumventing Congress and acting alone."

This program aired on January 8, 2015.

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