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Election 2016: Iowa Caucus Results46:43
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Winners, losers and the message from Iowa. We’ll tackle the outcome and the way ahead, with real results at last.

Josh Kent celebrates at Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, caucus night rally, Monday, Feb. 1, 2016, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Josh Kent celebrates at Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, caucus night rally, Monday, Feb. 1, 2016, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

So, Iowa has spoken. Its caucus-goers, anyway. Quite clearly for Ted Cruz on the Republican side of the ledger. He’s Number One. On the Democratic side, its coin-toss territory. Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders so close some wouldn’t say. The Iowa Democratic Party calling it for Clinton, and her camp glad to run with that but shaken by the squeaker. Trump and Rubio, two and three, buckling up for New Hampshire. This hour On Point, what Iowa just said.
-- Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Rachel Caulfield, professor of political science and associate director of the Harkin Institute for Public Policy and Citizen Engagement at Drake University. Author of the book, "The Iowa Caucus."

Molly Ball, national political correspondent for the Atlantic. (@mollyesque)

James Pindell, political reporter for the Boston Globe. (@JamesPindell)

From Tom’s Reading List

POLITICO: Ted Cruz wins 2016 Iowa caucuses — "The battle for the top spot between Trump and Cruz was one between precision and performance art. Cruz, whose campaign relied on a sophisticated data operation and massive army of volunteers on the ground to turn out the specific voters it needs to win, took the more traditional approach to Iowa’s caucuses."

The Atlantic: Trump on the Brink — "Trumpism is an ideology, not just a catharsis. An American working class desperate to get back what it once had, and anguished at the culture slipping away, has found an unlikely messenger for its decades of pent-up frustration. When Trump rants about Mexico and China and Syria and television sets made in South Korea, he is speaking to a large group of people who’ve felt disenfranchised for a long time."

Boston Globe: Four things to watch in the Iowa caucuses and later — "Iowa will be the first test of whether Sanders or Trump is actually leading a major political phenomenon. Yes, their crowds are larger than those that show up for other candidates. But there has been some question whether they can change the electorate by having nontraditional voters show up on caucus night. If Sanders and Trump bring out a lot of voters, as Barack Obama did in the 2008 caucuses, then that might be a signal they could be hard to stop."

This program aired on February 2, 2016.

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