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Facebook Live And The Future Of How We Watch46:15
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With guest host Jane Clayson.

Facebook makes another big move with Facebook Live.  Live video. Is this where the world will watch?

In this June 29, 2015, photo, Lauren Simo, left, answers questions during a weekly forum streamed via Periscope on the smartphone of Fish Consulting director of social media Toby Srebnik, at the company's offices in Hollywood, Fla. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)
In this June 29, 2015, photo, Lauren Simo, left, answers questions during a weekly forum streamed via Periscope on the smartphone of Fish Consulting director of social media Toby Srebnik, at the company's offices in Hollywood, Fla. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

Live-streaming looks set to be the next turn of the wheel in our digital, mobile culture. Last year, it was an app called Periscope. Now comes Facebook Live. Celebrities and just-folks are starting to livestream. Media companies are trying to make it work for them. And once again, it may mean more big changes in the way we communicate with each other. This hour On Point, Facebook Live and the new world of livestreaming.
-- Jane Clayson

Guests

Omar Gallaga, technology culture reporter for the Austin American-Statesman. Co-host of the Statesman Shots podcast. (@omarg)

Steven Perlberg, media and advertising reporter for The Wall Street Journal. (@perlberg)

Lauren Friedman, contributor to Forbes Magazine's Under 30 column and head of social business enablement at Adobe. (@Lauren_Hannah)

Douglas Rushkoff, professor of media theory and digital economics at the City University of New York. Author of many books, including, most recently, "Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus." (@rushkoff)

Amanda Oleander, painter and artist who live-streams studio sessions on Periscope and Facebook Live. (@AmandaOleander)

From The Reading List

The Wall Street Journal: Video Creators Are Frustrated With Pace of Facebook’s Antipirating Efforts -- "Facebook’s staggering growth in video—users now watch them about eight billion times a day across the social network—has made the issue more pressing for content creators. Though the financial toll freebooting has taken on creators is unclear and impossible to measure, they fear that fraudulent views potentially could dilute the money they draw from viewers who see advertising on YouTube."

Poynter: How 4 news organizations are using Facebook Live to reach broader audiences — "It's not hard to see why Facebook Live has proved alluring. The only equipment required is a smartphone with the Facebook app. There's no editing or post-production adjustment necessary, which cuts way down on the time required to produce a video. And most journalists — broadcast, print and Web — are becoming increasingly comfortable with informal, off-the-cuff video through apps like Skype, Facetime and Snapchat."

Re/Code: Periscope CEO: We’re Growing (And Facebook Doesn’t Scare Us One Bit!) — "It’s possible that Facebook’s interest in livestreaming has actually benefitted Periscope, at least temporarily. (It turns out people pay attention to areas that Mark Zuckerberg finds fascinating.) Periscope says that users are now watching 110 years worth of video every single day. That’s up from 41 years worth of video consumption back in August."

This program aired on April 4, 2016.

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