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Tips And Trends From Top Gardeners46:15
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Just in time for Memorial Day weekend, we’ve got top gardeners spilling the beans on how to grow everything.

In this Oct. 27, 2015, photo, Big Muddy Farms, an urban farm in northern Omaha, Neb. is seen amongst residential homes. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
In this Oct. 27, 2015, photo, Big Muddy Farms, an urban farm in northern Omaha, Neb. is seen amongst residential homes. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

It’s Memorial Day weekend, and Mother Nature is ready to receive your garden. It may be a whopping big plot of greens and goodies that will keep you and the neighborhood eating all year long. It may be a pot of soil on a fire escape that brings you a crop of six delicious tomatoes. Either way, you’ve got gardening questions, and we’ve got gardening answers from all over the country. This hour On Point, trends and tips from top gardeners on how to make the most of your garden’s growing season. — Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Barbara Damrosch, co-owner of the Four Season Farm in Harborside, ME. Gardening columnist for the Washington Post. Author of "The Four Season Farm Gardener's Cookbook," "Theme Gardens" and "The Garden Primer."

Steve Bender, senior writer and expert gardener at Southern Living, where he writes the Grumpy Gardener column. Editor and writer of "The New Southern Living Garden Book," "Southern Living Landscape Book" and "Southern Living Garden Problem Solver." (@grumpy_gardener)

Ketzel Levine, expert gardener and landscaper. Consultant at Garden Fever in Portland, OR. Former NPR senior correspondent. (@ketzelish)

From Tom’s Reading List

Washington Post: Green thumbs, take note: Brussels sprouts come in purple, too — "Purple Brussels sprouts come from the same lineage as purple cabbage (or red cabbage, as it’s usually called), and in both there is a color progression as the plants mature and cold weather sets in. The leaves of the young plants have a bluer tone than those of green cabbage, and the heads turn redder as they firm up."

Southern Living: Six Flowers That Sing The Blues — "It’s human nature. We disdain what is common and lust for what is rare. This is why gardeners drool over blue blossoms, because blue is the scarcest flower color of all. It also blends well with every other color. If you’re lusting in your heart and soil for blue, here are six great plants to scratch that itch."

The Guardian: ‘Grow three herbs and build up’ – the millennial’s guide to gardening — "When to prick out and when to pinch out, what to dead-head and what to mulch – the Royal Horticultural Society says a whole 'lost generation' of people in their 20s and 30s have no idea when it comes to gardening."

Read Executive Producer Karen Shiffman's Love Letter To Her Garden

This program aired on May 27, 2016.

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