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What The 'Alt-Right' White Supremacist Movement Wants47:30
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We look at the dreams, some now coming true, of the white supremacist “alt-right” movement.

In this Oct 7, 2016 photo, Steve Bannon, former head of Breitbart News and campaign CEO for then Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, appears at a national security meeting with advisers at Trump Tower in New York. (Evan Vucci/AP)
In this Oct 7, 2016 photo, Steve Bannon, former head of Breitbart News and campaign CEO for then Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, appears at a national security meeting with advisers at Trump Tower in New York. (Evan Vucci/AP)

For decades, the white supremacist advocates of what’s now called the “alt-right” movement were on the outer extremes of American political discourse. Suddenly, with the rise of Donald Trump, they’re on full display in the heart of Washington, talking white power and giving Nazi salutes. Mr. Trump disavows them, but his chief strategist Steve Bannon gave them a big, wide platform. This hour On Point, the white power dreams of the "alt-right." And we’ll look at Cuba after Fidel Castro. — Tom Ashbrook

Guests

Josh Harkinson, senior reporter for Mother Jones. (@JoshHarkinson)

Richard Cohen, president of the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Bob Inglis, former Republican U.S. Representative for South Carolina's Fourth Congressional District. Executive director of Republic-EN, a conservative nonprofit advocating for free market solutions to climate change. (@bobinglis)

From Tom's Reading List

Mother Jones: White Nationalists See Trump As Their Troll-In-Chief. Is He With Them? -- "For years, America's far right admired Europe's ethno-nationalists, who have capitalized on economic anxiety and xenophobia to win electoral support. Now the alt-right in America appears to have 'won the brass ring,' says Lawrence Rosenthal, chair of the University of California-Berkeley's Center for Right-Wing Studies. 'Trump not only won the support of these people, but he kind of institutionalized them.'"

Washington Post: ‘Let’s party like it’s 1933’: Inside the alt-right world of Richard Spencer — "For years, Spencer and his followers worked in obscure corners of the Internet to promote pride in white identity and the creation of an 'ethno-state' that would banish minorities. Then came the presidential campaign of Donald Trump, whose attacks on undocumented immigrants, Muslims and political correctness deeply resonated with them. Though Trump denounced the alt-right Tuesday, its adherents had crusaded for him on Twitter before the election and celebrated his victory as a seminal moment for their cause."

Pew Research Center: Many voters, especially blacks, expect race relations to worsen following Trump’s election -- "Voters are far more pessimistic about progress in race relations under Donald Trump than they were after Barack Obama’s election eight years ago, and the shift has been particularly striking among blacks."

This program aired on November 28, 2016.

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