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Congress Scrambles To Avoid Shutdown47:41
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In this Oct. 2, 2013 file photo, despite signs stating that the national parks are closed, people visit the World War II Memorial in Washington. (Susan Walsh/AP)
In this Oct. 2, 2013 file photo, despite signs stating that the national parks are closed, people visit the World War II Memorial in Washington. (Susan Walsh/AP)
This article is more than 3 years old.

With guest host John Harwood.

The shutdown showdown — as a DACA deal fades, Republicans are scrambling for a strategy to keep the government open even if it’s for only one month.

Guests:

Sheryl Gay Stolberg, Washington correspondent for the New York Times. (@SherylNYT)

Thomas Davis, director, federal government affairs at Deloitte, a global consulting firm. Former Republican member of the House of Representatives.

Steve Israel, political commentator for CNN. Former Democratic member of the House of Representatives. (@RepSteveIsrael)

From The Reading List:

New York Times: As Shutdown Talk Rises, Trump's Immigration Words Pose Risks For Both Parties — "President Trump’s incendiary words about immigration have dampened the prospects that a broad spending and immigration deal can be reached by the end of the week, raising the possibility of a government shutdown with unknown political consequences for lawmakers in both parties."

Crisis governance is back. If Congress and President Trump can’t agree on a budget plan by midnight Friday, the federal government once again will shut down. Will that actually happen, even in an all-Republican Washington? Haven’t politicians learned? How did we get here? We’ll talk with a top reporter and two former lawmakers who’ve been through it. This hour, On Point: will we learn that government can’t govern – again? --John Harwood

This program aired on January 18, 2018.

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