Advertisement

House Votes To Impeach President Trump On Abuse Of Power, Obstruction Of Justice46:32
Download

Play
The vote total showing the the passage of the first article of impeachment, abuse of power, against President Donald Trump by the House of Representatives at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019. (House Television via AP)
The vote total showing the the passage of the first article of impeachment, abuse of power, against President Donald Trump by the House of Representatives at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019. (House Television via AP)
This article is more than 1 year old.

The House vote on impeachment. We pause and consider what it means for the country.

Guest

Nancy Gibbs, former editor-in-chief of Time Magazine and current editor-at-large. Director of the Harvard Kennedy School's Shorenstein Center and the visiting Edward R. Murrow Professor of Practice of Press, Politics and Public Policy. Co-author of "The Preacher and the Presidents: Billy Graham in the White House" and "The Presidents Club: Inside the World's Most Exclusive Fraternity." (@nancygibbs)

From The Reading List

The New York Times: "House Votes to Impeach Trump on Abuse of Power and Obstruction of Congress" — "The House has impeached Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, sending the case to Senate for trial.

The House of Representatives on Wednesday impeached President Trump, charging him with 'high crimes and misdemeanors' and making him only the third president in history to face removal by the Senate.

"The votes on two articles of impeachment — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — fell largely along party lines, after about eight hours of contentious debate that underscored the deep divisions in the country and among its representatives.

Advertisement

"Nearly all Democrats supported the article on abuse of power, which accused Mr. Trump of using the power of his office to pressure Ukraine’s government to announce investigations that could discredit his political rivals. No Republicans voted in favor of impeachment."

Washington Post: "What happens next in the impeachment of President Trump?" — "The House will spend the day Wednesday debating the two impeachment articles on the House floor. The first article is for abuse of power, and the second is for obstructing the congressional inquiry.

"Lawmakers allotted themselves six hours to debate, but procedural maneuvers mean the proceedings could go well into the evening. Once debate is over, they will vote separately on the two articles of impeachment. If just one passes with a majority vote, Trump will be impeached.

"That won’t mean Trump is removed from office. The Senate determines whether that will happen. But let’s back up before we explain that."

NPR: "President Trump Impeached By The House In Historic Rebuke" — "House lawmakers voted to impeach President Trump on Wednesday in only the third such rebuke in American history.

"The move triggers a trial for Trump in the Senate, expected in January — one in which majority Republicans are likely to permit him to retain his office.

"The vote was 230 to 197 on the first of two articles of impeachment — abuse of power — with one member voting present. The House then proceeded to vote next on the second article — obstruction of Congress.

"The House vote follows months of talk by Democrats about impeaching Trump and investigations that deepened profound political division across the country."

This program aired on December 19, 2019.

Related:

Meghna Chakrabarti Twitter Host, On Point
Meghna Chakrabarti is the host of On Point.

More…

Wes Martin Freelance Producer
Wes Martin is a freelance producer for On Point.

More…

Advertisement

Advertisement