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New Hampshire And The Voting Rights Act07:01
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A rally in front of the Supreme Court in Washington DC, where justices are hearing cases on the Voting Rights Act. (David Sachs/SEIU)
A rally in front of the Supreme Court in Washington DC, where justices are hearing cases on the Voting Rights Act. (David Sachs/SEIU)

The Supreme Court is currently engaged in a tense back-and-forth over whether there is an ongoing need for the historic Voting Rights Act, which requires certain jurisdictions to seek federal approval before making changes to their electoral processes.

President Lyndon Johnson signed the Act in August 1965, five months after Bloody Sunday, when state and local police in Selma, Alabama, attacked voting rights marchers.

Since then, Congress has repeatedly resigned the Act, and it's considered by many to be the most effective legislation of the civil rights era. However, critics question whether it remains justifiable today.

While most of the affected states are in the south, it may come as a surprise that 10 towns in New Hampshire still fall under the Act.

Guest

Josh Rogers, senior political reporter for New Hampshire Public Radio

This segment aired on February 28, 2013.

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