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The Legal Case23:51
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Flowers rest at the blast site on Boylston Street between Dartmouth and Exeter Streets near the Boston Marathon finish line Monday, April 22, 2013 in Boston. Federal investigators formally released the finish line bombing crime scene to the city in a brief ceremony at 5 p.m. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
Flowers rest at the blast site on Boylston Street between Dartmouth and Exeter Streets near the Boston Marathon finish line Monday, April 22, 2013 in Boston. Federal investigators formally released the finish line bombing crime scene to the city in a brief ceremony at 5 p.m. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Somehow, the chaos is behind us. The bombings, the terror, the police chase, the shoot-outs are in the history books. One suspect is dead, and another lies wounded in a Boston hospital bed. And that's where the legal case against 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev began yesterday.

A judge magistrate read him his rights. According to a court transcript, Tsarnaev was alert enough to respond by nodding his head, at one point even mouthing the word, "no" when asked if he could afford his own attorney. Then he was charged with using a weapon of mass destruction that killed three people and destroyed public property.

And so a new story about American due process and the trial of the Boston marathon bomber begins.

Guests

Nancy Gertner, a former federal judge and a professor at Harvard Law School.

Alan Dershowitz, a lawyer and professor at Harvard Law School. You can find his recent comments on the case here.

More

Here's the charging document released yesterday.

This segment aired on April 23, 2013.

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