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Could The Tech World Have A Depression Problem?11:45
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Kumail Nanjiani, Zach Woods and Thomas Middleditch in a scene from the television series, "Silicon Valley," in which characters seek venture capital and try to launch a startup called Pied Piper. (HBO, Jaimie Trueblood/AP)
Kumail Nanjiani, Zach Woods and Thomas Middleditch in a scene from the television series, "Silicon Valley," in which characters seek venture capital and try to launch a startup called Pied Piper. (HBO, Jaimie Trueblood/AP)
This article is more than 5 years old.

There's been no shortage of depictions of the startup tech world in movies and TV lately — Jesse Eisenberg leading his burgeoning Facebook team on 16-hour coding sessions in "The Social Network," venture capitalists paying students to drop out of college and become entrepreneurs in HBO's "Silicon Valley."

Everyone is pulling all-nighters, beating the competition and smooth-talking investors to make their "billion dollar idea" a success.

It sounds glamorous, but it's a lot to live up to. And the less than healthy subtext is — forego sleep, food, family, friends, all for your company.

That kind of lifestyle can exacerbate depression and anxiety — both of which are becoming a serious problem in the tech startup world.

Guests

Dana Severson, co-founder of startupsanonymous.com. He tweets @danerobert.

Dr. Wesley Boyd, psychiatrist at Cambridge Health Alliance and assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He tweets @JWesleyBoydMD.

More

The Atlantic: Tech Has a Depression Problem

  • "Start-up founders might seem like they've got it made, but long hours, isolation, and stress put them at risk of mental illness."

This segment aired on October 10, 2014.

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