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The Mounting Frustrations Of Electronic Health Records07:10
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** ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY FEB. 26 ** Dr. Eugene Heslin sits at a desk with his laptop on Thursday, Feb. 2, 2006, at his family practice in Saugerties, N.Y.  From a laptop computer on his desk, he checks a cancer patient's hematology report from one lab and an X-ray report on another patient _ tasks that used to require phone calls or paper files.  (AP Photo/ Jim McKnight)
** ADVANCE FOR SUNDAY FEB. 26 ** Dr. Eugene Heslin sits at a desk with his laptop on Thursday, Feb. 2, 2006, at his family practice in Saugerties, N.Y. From a laptop computer on his desk, he checks a cancer patient's hematology report from one lab and an X-ray report on another patient _ tasks that used to require phone calls or paper files. (AP Photo/ Jim McKnight)
This article is more than 5 years old.

The U.S. government has spent $25 billion to promote the use of electronic health records. Supporters say those records improve doctor productivity and reduce costs. But many doctors are pushing back — saying that strict federal guidelines interfere with patient care.

Guest

Carey Goldbergco-host of WBUR’s CommonHealth blog, which tweets @commonhealth.

More

Healthcare IT News: AMA Docs Fed Up with EHR Woes

  • "Our experience as physicians is often falling far short of the promise that I think we all hope we eventually reach."

Scientific American: Electronic Health Records Software Often Written Without Doctors' Input

  • "The reason why many doctors find electronic health records (EHR) difficult to use might be that the software wasn't properly tested, researchers suggest."

This segment aired on September 28, 2015.

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