Support the news

WHO Declares Emergency Over Microcephaly — Condition Possibly Linked To Zika Virus14:56
Download

Play
Gleyse Kelly da Silva, 27, holds her daughter Maria Giovanna, who was born with microcephaly, outside their house in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. (Felipe Dana/AP)MoreCloseclosemore
Gleyse Kelly da Silva, 27, holds her daughter Maria Giovanna, who was born with microcephaly, outside their house in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. (Felipe Dana/AP)

Zika, the mosquito-borne virus that's spreading rapidly in Latin America and the Caribbean, could be connected to thousands of reported cases of microcephaly in Brazil — an awful condition that results in babies born with brain damage and unusually small heads.

Monday Dr. Margaret Chan, director-general of the World Health Organization, declared the microcephaly outbreak a global emergency.

Guests

Carey Goldberg, co-host of WBUR's CommonHealth blog. She tweets @commonhealth.

Dr. Davidson Hamer, professor of global health and medicine at the Boston University School of Public Health. He's also school of medicine director at Boston Medical Center's travel clinic.

More

BBC: Zika-Linked Condition: WHO Declares Global Emergency

  • "A disease linked to the Zika virus in Latin America poses a global public health emergency requiring a united response, says the World Health Organization."

The New York Times: Microcephaly, Spotlighted By Zika Virus, Has Long Afflicted And Mystified

  • "The images pouring out of Brazil are haunting: struggling newborns with misshapen heads, cradled by mothers who desperately want to know whether their babies will ever walk or talk."

Slate: Could Climate Change Amplify The Zika Outbreak?

  • "As the Zika virus spreads throughout Latin America, alarm bells are blaring and questions are flying: How dangerous is this disease? Could it reach the United States and spread here? How bad would it be?"

This segment aired on February 1, 2016.

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news