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How The NRA's True Strength Is In Their Fundraising11:29
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Attendees look over a pistol display at the National Rifle Association's annual convention in Friday, April 25, 2014 in Indianapolis. (AP)
Attendees look over a pistol display at the National Rifle Association's annual convention in Friday, April 25, 2014 in Indianapolis. (AP)
This article is more than 1 year old.

The National Rifle Association, through its own media group, NRA TV, aired an extended interview with a Texas resident who exchanged fire with Devin Kelley, the church shooter who killed 26 people on Sunday.

"I kept hearing those shots and I knew that every shot might be representing people being hit by a bullet," said Stephen Willeford, of Sutherland Springs, Texas. "I didn’t even put shoes on. I ran out the door."

NRA TV described Willeford as an "NRA member and hero," meaning he is one of the 5 million dues-paying Americans who are NRA members. Those numbers, plus the existence of things like NRA TV, show the reach and influence the group.

Another measure of influence: its money.

Guest

Evan Horowitz, Boston Globe's "Quick Study" Columnist. Evan tweets @globehorowitz.

This segment aired on November 7, 2017.

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