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Remembering The Profound Legacy Of Eunice Kennedy Shriver25:00
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Adonis Brown of Baltimore, Md. smiles as Mrs. Eunice Kennedy Shriver hangs a gold medal around his neck in Aug. 17, 1972 at the International Special Olympics. (Wally Fong/AP)
Adonis Brown of Baltimore, Md. smiles as Mrs. Eunice Kennedy Shriver hangs a gold medal around his neck in Aug. 17, 1972 at the International Special Olympics. (Wally Fong/AP)
This article is more than 1 year old.

Joseph Kennedy once said of his daughter, Eunice, "If that girl had been born with balls, she would have been a hell of a politician." But of course, in the Kennedy clan, it was the men who were groomed for political stardom and the women were meant to support them.

But in her new biography, Pulitizer Prize-winning journalist Eileen McNamara makes the persuasive case that of all the Kennedys, it was Eunice who had the greatest, most lasting impact on American life, including the creation of Special Olympics.

Eileen McNamara will be speaking about her book on April 3 at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and on May 11 at the Harvard Bookstore

Guest

Eileen McNamara, a Pulitzer Prize-winning former columnist for The Boston Globe, and author of the new book "Eunice: The Kennedy Who Changed The World."

This segment aired on April 2, 2018.

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