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Human Feces Can Cure Some Infections. Is The FDA About To Restrict It?09:26
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Bottles of frozen human stool for fecal transplants at the nation's first stool bank, OpenBiome. (Photo: Gabrielle Emanuel/WBUR)
Bottles of frozen human stool for fecal transplants at the nation's first stool bank, OpenBiome. (Photo: Gabrielle Emanuel/WBUR)

The Boston area is the epicenter of a debate dividing the medical community.

The argument? How human feces should be regulated.

That's right — fecal transplanting is the process of transferring poop from a healthy donor to a sick patient. And it's proven effective for treating certain infections.

But some doctors and patient advocates are concerned that the Food and Drug Administration is about to clamp down on this radical therapy.

Guests

Dr. Jessica Allegrettidirector of the Fecal Microbiota Transplant Program at Brigham and Women's Hospital. She tweets @DrJessicaA.

Carolyn Edelstein, executive director of OpenBiome, a non-profit stool bank in Cambridge. She tweets @caredelstein.

This segment aired on April 12, 2019.

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