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National Reckoning Over Race Renews Opposition To Local Monuments, Statues25:00
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The statue in the city's Park Square is a replica of the Emancipation Memorial in Washington and depicts Lincoln with one hand raised above a kneeling man with broken shackles on his wrists. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
The statue in the city's Park Square is a replica of the Emancipation Memorial in Washington and depicts Lincoln with one hand raised above a kneeling man with broken shackles on his wrists. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Our national reckoning over race in America has renewed attention and opposition to monuments, both nationally and locally. A statue of Christopher Columbus in downtown Boston was beheaded last week and taken down to assess the damage.
That spurred calls to permanently remove the statue by local indigenous groups. The Italian American Alliance said the statue should be repaired and returned.
There was also a renewal of a push to change the name of Faneuil Hall and a petition to remove a statue of Abraham Lincoln and a kneeling Black man in Park Square.
We take stock of what our local monuments in public spaces mean, and how that's resonating in our current moment with Michael Jeffries, associate professor of American Studies at Wellesley.

This segment aired on June 15, 2020.

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