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WBUR Investigates Civil Forfeiture In Massachusetts47:52
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A civil forfeiture notice published in the Worcester Telegram & Gazette in 2016 from the Worcester County DA notifying more than 700 people to take legal action if they want to dispute the DA's claims to their money. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
A civil forfeiture notice published in the Worcester Telegram & Gazette in 2016 from the Worcester County DA notifying more than 700 people to take legal action if they want to dispute the DA's claims to their money. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

This is the Radio Boston rundown for August 18, 2021. Jamie Bologna is our host.

  • Did you know that police and district attorneys in Massachusetts can legally seize your money and your property and never return it, even if you're cleared of any wrongdoing? It's possible under a process called "civil forfeiture," and a new WBUR investigation, in partnership with ProPublica, is shedding light on civil asset forfeiture in the state. Joining us to talk about the investigation are WBUR Investigative Reporter Shannon Dooling and WBUR Investigative Data Reporter Saurabh Datar.
  • *Disclaimer: This segment discusses rape and sexual assault.* Thanks to a bill that became law just a few weeks ago, thousands of back-logged rape kits in Massachusetts will soon be tested for the first time. The over 6,000 kits are part of a pileup that stretches all the way back to 2000. Joining use now to discuss the bill and its impact on survivors is its sponsor, State Representative Natalie Higgins and Kim Dawkins, president of Pathways for Change, a rape and sexual assault crisis center that services dozens of communities in Central Massachusetts.
  • Change has been a consistent theme of the pandemic: changing risks, changing rules and guidelines, and even a changing virus. Today, we're discussing how that change has impacted our work: where we work, how we work, and what office life looks like. We discuss the future of work with Katie Johnston, a business reporter for the Boston Globe covering work and income inequality. Then, we take listener calls on the changing workplace with Segun Idowu, president and CEO of the Black Economic Council of Massachusetts, and Lauren Jones, executive Vice President at Massachusetts Business Roundtable.

This program aired on August 18, 2021.

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