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Four Black leaders on how they see Boston today and in the future48:04
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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., protected by umbrella from rain addresses civil rights marchers on historic Boston Common April 23, 1965 after a march from the Roxbury section. King came to Boston, to lead the demonstration to protest segregation in schools, jobs and housing. (AP)
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., protected by umbrella from rain addresses civil rights marchers on historic Boston Common April 23, 1965 after a march from the Roxbury section. King came to Boston, to lead the demonstration to protest segregation in schools, jobs and housing. (AP)

A special hour of Radio Boston, in which we revisit a January 2021 hour with four Black leaders on how they see Boston today and in the future. Tiziana Dearing is our host.

  • Monica Cannon-Grant is the founder and CEO of the nonprofit, Violence in Boston, focused on advocating for marginalized communities. She joined us to talk about her activism.
  • State Rep. Liz Miranda, who represents Massachusetts' 5th Suffolk District, talks about her journey from community organizer to state politician, and how she has embodied Martin Luther King's legacy in her work.
  • Imari Paris Jeffries is the executive director of King Boston, the nonprofit working to build a sculpture and implement other programming to honor Dr. and Coretta Scott King.
  • Michael Bobbitt, who was then preparing take the helm of the Mass. Cultural Council, talks about his vision for the region, what the arts mean for us, and the connection between the arts and the work of civil rights.

This program aired on December 28, 2021.

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