Nobel Winner's Research Gives Hope To A Family Dealing With Autism05:56
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The Supple family outside their home in Natick. (Lynn Jolicoeur/WBUR)
The Supple family outside their home in Natick. (Lynn Jolicoeur/WBUR)
Stuart Supple, 10, foreground, and his brother, Timmy, love spending time in pools. That’s why their mother, Kate, left, thought it would be the best place for them to meet Dr. Thomas Sudhof, the man who’s been studying their genes for five years. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
Stuart Supple, 10, foreground, and his brother, Timmy, love spending time in pools. That’s why their mother, Kate, left, thought it would be the best place for them to meet Dr. Thomas Sudhof, the man who’s been studying their genes for five years. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

For most parents of children with autism, the disorder is a mystery. They have no idea what caused it and can only use therapies to try to deal with the symptoms.

But a Massachusetts couple that does know what caused their two sons' autism is working with researchers who hope to develop a treatment. One of those scientists is a Nobel Prize winner.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Lynn Jolicoeur of WBUR brings us this story.

Guest

This segment aired on November 12, 2013.

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