Is It Too Late To Save Florida's Apalachicola River?09:47
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Georgia Ackerman (left), Apalachicola riverkeeper, from the nonprofit Waterkeeper Alliance, and Roy Ogles, who recently retired from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. (Mark Wallheiser for Here & Now)
Georgia Ackerman (left), Apalachicola riverkeeper, from the nonprofit Waterkeeper Alliance, and Roy Ogles, who recently retired from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. (Mark Wallheiser for Here & Now)
This article is more than 1 year old.

This story was reported during our election road trip to states across the country ahead of the 2018 midterms. Check out all of our election coverage.


Florida's Apalachicola River is one of its most important. It starts hundreds of miles north of Atlanta as the Chattahoochee River, before heading through Florida and bringing its fresh water all the way to the Gulf of Mexico. Its rich estuaries are among North America's most diverse — but scientists, researchers and people in the oyster industry say the ecosystem and life in the Apalachicola region are under serious threat.

Here & Now's Robin Young reports from Apalachicola, Florida.

More Photos

A man bikes past storm debris on River Street in Apalachicola, Fla. (Chris Bentley/Here & Now)
A man bikes past storm debris on River Street in Apalachicola, Fla. (Chris Bentley/Here & Now)
Debris in front of 13 Mile Seafood in Apalachicola, Fla. (Chris Bentley/Here & Now)
Debris in front of 13 Mile Seafood in Apalachicola, Fla. (Chris Bentley/Here & Now)

This segment aired on October 25, 2018.

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