Support the news

What's The Difference Between 'Radical Islam' And 'Radical Islamism'?11:36
Download

Play
President Barack Obama speaks at the Treasury Department in Washington, Tuesday, June 14, 2016, following a meeting with his National Security Council, to get updates on the investigation into the attack in Orlando, Florida and review efforts to degrade and destroy ISIL. (Susan Walsh/AP)
President Barack Obama speaks at the Treasury Department in Washington, Tuesday, June 14, 2016, following a meeting with his National Security Council, to get updates on the investigation into the attack in Orlando, Florida and review efforts to degrade and destroy ISIL. (Susan Walsh/AP)
This article is more than 3 years old.

President Obama spoke Tuesday at the Treasury Department in Washington about the shootings at a gay nightclub in Orlando early Sunday morning that left 49 people dead.

The shooter called 911 during the attack to state his allegiance to the so-called Islamic State.

"For a while now, the main contribution of some of my friends on the other side of the aisle have made in the fight against ISIL is to criticize this administration and me for not using the phrase 'radical Islam,'" said the president. "'That's the key,' they tell us. 'We can't beat ISIL unless we call them radical Islamists.' What exactly would using this label accomplish? What exactly would it change? Would it make ISIL less committed to trying to kill Americans? Would it bring in more allies? Is there a military strategy that is served by this? The answer is none of the above. Calling a threat by a different name does not make it go away. This is a political distraction."

Guest

Noah Feldman, professor of law at Harvard Law School. Author of "Fall and Rise of the Islamic State" among other books. He tweets @NoahRFeldman.

This segment aired on June 14, 2016.

More:

Meghna Chakrabarti Twitter Host, On Point
Meghna Chakrabarti is the host of On Point.

More…

Emma-Jean Weinstein Twitter Associate Producer, Radio Boston
Emma-Jean Weinstein was formerly an associate producer for Radio Boston.

More…

+Join the discussion
TwitterfacebookEmail

Support the news