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How Are Our Longer Life Spans Changing How We Live?25:29
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Among previous generations, people between the ages of 65 and 80 were preparing for death. Now, many are working well past retirement age, (Unsplash)
Among previous generations, people between the ages of 65 and 80 were preparing for death. Now, many are working well past retirement age, (Unsplash)
This article is more than 4 years old.

If you're between the ages of 65 and 80, congratulations! You're in a new stage of adulthood.

Among previous generations, this was the time to prepare for death. But now, traditional milestones are delayed across generations: from snake people putting off marriage to seniors putting off retirement.

This new period of adulthood is the subject of the new book, "The Age of Longevity: Re-Imagining Tomorrow for Our New Long Lives."

Guests

Rosalind Barnett, senior scientist at Brandeis University's Women's Studies Research Center. She's co-author of "The Age of Longevity: Re-Imagining Tomorrow for Our New Long Lives."

Caryl Rivers, professor of journalism at Boston University's College of Communication.

This segment aired on August 29, 2016.

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