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North Atlantic Right Whale Could Face Extinction07:21
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FILE - In this April 10, 2008 file photo, the head of a North Atlantic right whale peers up from the water as another whale passes behind in Cape Cod Bay near Provincetown, Mass.  Federal officials plan to provide more details on their investigation into the recent deaths of endangered North Atlantic right whales. The whales are among the rarest marine mammals in the world. Only about 500 right whales exist. At least 13 right whales were found dead this year off New England and Canada. More details on the investigation are to be released Friday, Aug. 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia, File)MoreCloseclosemore
FILE - In this April 10, 2008 file photo, the head of a North Atlantic right whale peers up from the water as another whale passes behind in Cape Cod Bay near Provincetown, Mass. Federal officials plan to provide more details on their investigation into the recent deaths of endangered North Atlantic right whales. The whales are among the rarest marine mammals in the world. Only about 500 right whales exist. At least 13 right whales were found dead this year off New England and Canada. More details on the investigation are to be released Friday, Aug. 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia, File)

The North Atlantic right whale has been on the endangered species list since 1970 but, now, with a total population hovering around 450, it could be faced with extinction.

In the past year, 17 of the whales were reported dead, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The birth rate for the whales was also drastically low, with only five calves born in 2017.

Guest

Roz Rolland, senior scientist at the Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life at the New England Aquarium, which tweets @neaq.

This segment aired on December 11, 2017.

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