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Week Ahead: 2020 Latest, Looking To South Carolina, White House Shake-Ups46:16
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Supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., cheer as they watch results of the Nevada Cacus during a campaign event in San Antonio, Saturday, Feb. 22, 2020. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., cheer as they watch results of the Nevada Cacus during a campaign event in San Antonio, Saturday, Feb. 22, 2020. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Candidates take the Nevada results and move on to South Carolina. Plus, post-impeachment shake-ups in the Trump administration. We’ll look at the week ahead in news.

Guests

Major Garrett, chief Washington correspondent for CBS News. (@MajorCBS)

Kimberly Atkins, senior news correspondent for WBUR. (@KimberlyEAtkins)

Jack Beatty, On Point news analyst. (@JackBeattyNPR)

Robert Costa, national political reporter for the Washington Post. Moderator of Washington Week on PBS. (@costareports)

From The Reading List

The New York Times: "How Bernie Sanders Dominated in Nevada" — "They showed up to Desert Pines High School in Tío Bernie T-shirts to caucus on Saturday morning, motivated by the idea of free college tuition, 'Medicare for all' and the man making those promises: a 78-year-old white senator from Vermont. To dozens of mostly working-class Latinos, Bernie Sanders seemed like one of their own, a child of immigrants who understands what it means to be seen as a perpetual outsider.

"For at least one day, in one state, the long-promised political revolution of Mr. Sanders came to vivid life, a multiracial coalition of immigrants, college students, Latina mothers, younger black voters, white liberals and even some moderates who embraced his idea of radical change and lifted him to victory in the Nevada caucuses on Saturday.

"By harnessing such a broad cross-section of voters, Mr. Sanders offered a preview of the path that he hopes to take to the Democratic presidential nomination: uniting an array of voting blocs in racially diverse states in the West and the South and in economically strapped parts of the Midwest and the Southwest, all behind the message of social and economic justice that he has preached for years."

The Philadelphia Inquirer: "‘We just barely turned blue’: Bernie Sanders is getting stronger and some Democrats are getting worried." — "From Delaware and Chester Counties to the Lehigh Valley to bedroom communities outside Pittsburgh, and in suburbs of Detroit, Milwaukee, and Washington, Democrats have racked up wins in previously hostile territory, helped by affluent, college educated voters who have recoiled from the president.

"But now, as self-described democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders roars ahead in the presidential primary, winning Nevada’s caucuses Saturday to establish himself as the clear Democratic front-runner, some party officials in Pennsylvania and New Jersey worry that if he becomes the nominee, he could cost them hard-won gains.
Sanders argues his revolutionary zeal can energize previously disengaged voters among the young, people of color, and the white working class.

"But that approach runs counter to the get-things-done messages that helped moderate Democrats such as Chester County’s Chrissy Houlahan and South Jersey’s Andy Kim flip 40 Republican congressional seats in 2018 to take control of the U.S. House. Moderate approaches have also driven wins in state legislative, county commissioner, and even prothonotary races."

This program aired on February 24, 2020.

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