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The Psychology Of Climate Change — And How To Engage With It47:18
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Climate activists march in an attempt to occupy the Garzweiler open-cast coal mine and nearby gas infrastructure on a day of civil disobedience organized by the "Ende Gelaende" movement on September 26, 2020 near Grevenbroich, Germany. (Sascha Schuermann/Getty Images)
Climate activists march in an attempt to occupy the Garzweiler open-cast coal mine and nearby gas infrastructure on a day of civil disobedience organized by the "Ende Gelaende" movement on September 26, 2020 near Grevenbroich, Germany. (Sascha Schuermann/Getty Images)

Climate change presents a grim future. We know what we’re up against, yet our impulse is to look away, to say we’ll worry about it later. The psychology of climate change and how to engage.  

Guests

Renee Lertzman, climate psychologist and consultant. Founder of Project Inside Out. (@reneelertzman)

Rosimar Rios-Berrios, atmospheric scientist at NCAR, the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Member of Science Moms. (@RosimarWx)

Also Featured

Nicholas Cain, Jr., youth climate and wildlife activist in Atlanta, Georgia. Founder of the North American Climate Activist Organization. (@NickCainJr)

From The Reading List

New Yorker: "The Moms Who Are Battling Climate Change" — "Three years ago, I had a baby. I won’t go into the details, but suffice it to say that she is extremely cute, and I enjoy being her mother."

New York Times: "Amid Biden Climate Push, a Question Looms: Is America’s Word Good?" — "President Biden faces a fundamental question as he convenes heads of state this week in a virtual summit to declare that the United States is ready to reclaim a leadership role in the fight against climate change: Is America’s word still any good?"

Washington Post: "Biden plans to cut emissions at least in half by 2030" — "President Biden this week will pledge to slash U.S. greenhouse gas emissions at least in half by the end of the decade, according to two people briefed on the plan, as part of an aggressive push to combat climate change at home and persuade other major economies around the world to follow suit."

The Guardian: "'Hijacked by anxiety': how climate dread is hindering climate action" — "You’re browsing in a supermarket and fretting mildly about the air miles of some green beans. Or you’re daydreaming of that island holiday you deserve once the pandemic has died down but worrying about whether you should be flying."

Washington Post: "The U.S. embarks on a huge climate reset" — "The Biden administration is trying to undo the work of its predecessor in many ways. But the most striking — and likely most consequential — reversal is on climate."

The Guardian: "Climate anxiety and PTSD are on the rise. Therapists don’t always know how to cope" — "Andrew Bryant, a therapist based in Tacoma, Washington, felt helpless the first time climate change came up in his office. It was 2016, and a client was agonizing over whether to have a baby."

This program aired on April 22, 2021.

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