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Boeing Crashes Raise Questions About FAA Oversight17:30
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A Boeing 737 MAX 8 being built for for Shanghai Airlines sits parked at Boeing Co.'s Renton Assembly Plant, Monday, March 11, 2019, in Renton, Wash. (Ted S. Warren/AP)
A Boeing 737 MAX 8 being built for for Shanghai Airlines sits parked at Boeing Co.'s Renton Assembly Plant, Monday, March 11, 2019, in Renton, Wash. (Ted S. Warren/AP)
This article is more than 1 year old.

Hundreds of Boeing 737 MAX jets remained grounded around the world Monday, after the model was involved in two deadly crashes in the past five months.

As investigators in multiple countries work to determine the causes, there are questions here at home about the Federal Aviation Administration's relationship with Boeing.

The Seattle Times reported over the weekend that FAA managers pushed the agency's engineers to hand over much of the safety-testing responsibility to Boeing, itself.

The resulting safety analysis had crucial flaws, according to the newspaper.

Meanwhile, the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee is promising to conduct "rigorous oversight with every tool at our disposal to get to the bottom of the FAA's decision-making process."

Massachusetts Congressman Stephen Lynch is a member of that committee, and joined us to discuss how Congress will conduct its oversight.

Guest

Rep. Stephen Lynch, congressman for Massachusetts' 8th District. He tweets @RepStephenLynch.

This article was originally published on March 18, 2019.

This segment aired on March 18, 2019.

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