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How Should Boston Address Its History Of Slavery?25:06
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Faneuil Hall, of the most iconic buildings in Boston, where the earliest calls for independence from Britain were sounded in the late 1700s, is named for a man who owned and traded black slaves. Now a move to rename the historic structure is gaining momentum. (Charles Krupa/AP)
Faneuil Hall, of the most iconic buildings in Boston, where the earliest calls for independence from Britain were sounded in the late 1700s, is named for a man who owned and traded black slaves. Now a move to rename the historic structure is gaining momentum. (Charles Krupa/AP)

There's a new debate emerging over the proposed memorial to slavery at Faneuil Hall.

The idea for the memorial emerged as many activists called for Faneuil Hall to be renamed, because of Peter Faneuil's history as a slave trader.

But last week the artist who proposed the memorial — Steve Locke — said he was withdrawing his project.

Guests

Jerome Campbell, WBUR reporting fellow. He tweets @JeromeRCampbell.

Steve Locke, former artist-in-residence for the city of Boston. He tweets @steve_locke.

Marty Blatt, history professor and director of the public history program at Northeastern University.

David Harris, managing director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice at Harvard Law School.

This segment aired on July 22, 2019.

Earlier Coverage:

Tiziana Dearing Twitter Host, Radio Boston
Tiziana Dearing is the host of Radio Boston.

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Walter Wuthmann Twitter Freelance Producer
Walter Wuthmann is a freelance producer for Radio Boston and WBUR's Newscast.

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Paris Alston Twitter Producer, Radio Boston
Paris is an associate producer for Radio Boston.

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Jerome Campbell Twitter Reporter
Jerome Campbell was a WBUR Poverty and Justice Fellow whose reporting was supported by the Economic Hardship Reporting Project.

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