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On Point Special Series: 'In Search Of Truth'

What do you picture when you think of truth? Here's a popular example ... (Three Lions/Getty Images)
What do you picture when you think of truth? Here's a popular example ... (Three Lions/Getty Images)

This series is produced in collaboration with The Conversation


What is truth?

The basic definition of "truth," according to Merriam-Webster's handy dictionary, is "the body of real things, events and facts."

But what does that actually mean?

Next week, On Point will air a four-part series that explores just that: what we mean when we talk about "truth."

It's a big topic. And it starts with the big picture philosophy of truth.

To kickoff our special series, Part I (airing Monday, Feb. 24), will look at the history of truth: how we use it, what it is, how it works. Has humankind always searched for truth and valued it?

Read more below to learn about the arc of our four-part series.


Here's the series breakdown:

Part I — The History Of How We Think About Truth (Feb. 24): What is truth? When we say truth — what do we mean? We'll take a look at the long, historical view of how humankind has understood the concept of truth.

Part II — The Science Behind How We Perceive Truth (Feb. 25): We'll look at the neuroscience of truth. How do our brains acquire and process truth? How did we evolve to believe the things we do? How does society influence our perception of truth?

Part III — How The Powerful Manipulate Truth (Feb. 26): We'll look at how leaders use, distort and honor truth. How do governments, from authoritarian to Democratic, utilize truth — or withhold it — to gain power?

Part IV — Are We Living In A Post-Truth World? (Feb. 27): Now that we've set up the history of truth, what's next? Do we live in a post-truth world? How do we find truth in the digital age? Where do we go from here?


We want to hear from you!

Have a question or comment for one of the hours in our four-part series?

Leave your question or comment below. Please specify what hour you are leaving your question for. (For example: "My question is for Part IV. Have we always lived in a post-truth era?")

You can also leave us a voicemail. Call 617-353-0683.

And if you have any other questions or want to elaborate on any of your answers, just send us an email at onpointnpr@gmail.com.

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